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Thread: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

  1. #1
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    Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    L.A. Life story out today rips Garth and "New Country" for the decline in sales and the Coutnry Stations that are changing formats:
    <br>from: http://www.dailynews.com/archives/today/lif01.asp
    <br>
    Will country music survive Garth Brooks?
    <br>By Glenn Whipp
    <br>Staff Writer
    <br>
    <br>When the curtain came up on the 35th annual Academy of Country Music awards last May at the Universal Amphitheatre, country icons George Strait and Alan Jackson tore into “Murder on Music Row,” the controversial song that bemoans the fact that “someone killed country music, cut out its heart and soul.”
    <br>
    <br>Academy members stood and applauded when the song ended. And then they gave their top prizes that evening to Shania Twain, Faith Hill, Tim McGraw and Lonestar, acts that are about as country as a four-course meal with Donald Trump in a French restaurant. The message to traditionalists like Strait and Jackson was loud and clear: Nice song, passe sentiment.
    <br>
    <br>But in its headstrong rush to move units and gain mass acceptance, Nashville may well be alienating the core group of fans who are most loyal to the music. Southland country radio certainly has lost its luster. One station, Orange County-based KIK-FM (94.3), recently switched formats because of anemic ratings, and another, KZLA (93.9), may soon be following suit. That would leave Riverside’s KFRG (95.1) as the area’s only country station.
    <br>
    <br>“There’s been a tremendous slump all over the country,” says Bill Mack, whose “Country Crossroads” syndicated radio show is heard on more than 800 stations. “The problem is that the radio stations play the same songs, and all the songs sound pretty much the same. The product is hurting, and the music companies and radio stations are doing a pretty good job of destroying it even more.”
    <br>
    <br>Adds journalist Stacy Harris, whose “Stacy’s Music Row Report” Internet newsletter is Nashville’s equivalent of “The Drudge Report,” “Country music has always been cyclical. Where the focus was once attaining respectability, the goal is now to find and maintain an audience that is much larger and much younger than is realistic for the format to sustain.”
    <br>
    <br>“The result,” Harris continues, “is that the young audience continues to be fickle — and therefore unpredictable — while the older, loyal audience is turning away as it can no longer identify with either the new artists or their music.”
    <br>
    <br>Country’s last boom/bust period came in the wake of “Urban Cowboy,” mechanical bulls and J.R. Ewing. Bland, middle-of-the-road ballads and rock-tinged anthems ruled the day until new traditionalists like Randy Travis, Dwight Yoakam and Strait came along in the mid- to late-’80s and reworked the genre’s classic sound into new and fresh music that was still pure country.
    <br>
    <br>Then Garth Brooks hit it big and country music never has quite recovered. Brooks’ blend of pop, folk, rock and honky-tonk made him Nashville’s biggest superstar, becoming the first country artist to debut a record at the top of the charts (“Ropin’ the Wind,” 1992).
    <br>
    <br>But Brooks’ mass appeal came with a price — namely, the music. The more albums Brooks sold, the more he became obsessed with chart positions and gimmick marketing. Essentially, he has become the McDonald’s of modern music, his laser focus trained not on the songs, but on the number of units sold as he edges closer and closer to the Beatles’ all-time record.
    <br>
    <br>“Garth Brooks might have been the best and worst thing to happen to country music in its history,” says John Malone, program director for Nashville’s legendary country radio station WSM-AM, originator of the Grand Ole Opry. “Record companies became so dazzled by his success that they’re now focusing on developing acts that are marketable to the masses instead of looking at what’s special about country music. In the process, the music has lost a lot of its identity and become so much cookie-cutter product.”
    <br>
    <br>Nowhere is that more evident than the tightly formatted playlists of country radio, which seems to repeat the same 40 songs by pop-oriented acts like Twain, Hill and a dozen other interchangeable acts on a continuous loop throughout the day.
    <br>
    <br>“So many of the artists sound so much alike, I don’t know who’s singing half the time — and I’m a disc jockey,” Mack says ruefully.
    <br>
    <br>“Murder on Music Row,” written by songwriting great and bluegrass artist Larry Cordle along with Larry Shell, submits that “old Hank (Williams) wouldn’t have a chance on today’s radio” and that, likewise, living legends Merle Haggard and George Jones would be told to “pack up and go back home.”
    <br>
    <br>The song hardly exaggerates the case since none of these artists — even Jones, who just took home a Grammy for his most recent album — can find any airplay on country hit radio stations like KZLA. The situation is so comically dire that after Johnny Cash’s “Unchained” won the Grammy in 1998 for best country album, his record company took out a full- page advertisement in Billboard “thanking” country radio for its support. The photo with the ad (taken during Cash’s legendary San Quentin concert) showed Cash defiantly giving the camera his middle finger.
    <br>
    <br>“Through research, we just don’t see enough of a call to play the older songs,” says KZLA program director R.J. Curtis. “That’s not to say we don’t like that music. But somebody like Johnny Cash would sound too extreme next to most of the music we play.”
    <br>
    <br>Dallas radio personality Mark Edwards, who hosts the syndicated “Country Coast To Coast” program, concurs.
    <br>
    <br>“We’re not driving 1957 automobiles are we?” Edwards asks. “Music changes.”
    <br>
    <br>But for programmers like Mack and Malone, juxtaposing a singer like Cash with modern artists who stay true to country’s traditions (the Dixie Chicks, Brooks and Dunn, Montgomery Gentry) has proved to be a winning formula.
    <br>
    <br>“We also expose listeners to a lot of great new music not getting airplay on country hit radio,” WSM’s Malone says, citing Dolly Parton’s bluegrass album and Loretta Lynn’s new single, “Country In My Genes” as a couple of examples.
    <br>
    <br>Adds Mack: “We get a tremendous response to the older songs and it’s not limited to the older audience. College students call all the time to request Hank Williams.”
    <br>
    <br>Indeed, ratings for both WSM and Mack’s program show strong support from 25- to 54-year-old listeners, radio’s most desirable demographic. The reason behind the healthy listenership isn’t hard to fathom.
    <br>
    <br>“Great songs, great singers,” journalist Harris says.
    <br>
    <br>Just how timeless the music is can be heard in Columbia Legacy’s marvelous American Milestones reissue series. The label recently remastered a second batch of classic country albums, including Willie Nelson’s wistful concept collection “Red Headed Stranger,” Jones’ 1980 landmark “I Am What I Am” and the complete version of Cash’s classic San Quentin concert. This is enduring music, as vital today as when it was made decades ago. But you’ll have to buy the albums to hear the songs; country hit radio won’t play them.
    <br>
    <br>“Americans don’t seem to get it,” says Londoner Alfred Kennedy, whose first exposure to country music came courtesy of Los Angeles’ once-great country station, KLAC (570-AM). “In London, we have one country station, and it’s not constrained by playlists, just listeners’ tastes, which is as it should be.”
    <br>
    <br>In a recent millennial vote, listeners of this London country station (Ritz Country 1035-AM) named Jones’ “She Stopped Loving Me Today,” a classic tale of heartbreak found on “I Am What I Am,” as the song of the century. But KZLA’s Curtis says that the 20-year-old song has no place on his station’s playlist, despite its enduring appeal.
    <br>
    <br>“In this marketplace, you need songs that attract a mass audience,”Curtis says. “You want the traditional country sound, but listeners don’t want a format dominated by songs that are too twangy, particularly here in Los Angeles.”
    <br>
    <br>Even without the twang, KZLA’s ratings aren’t particularly stellar. The station came in 20th in the most recent Arbitron report, and its new owner, Emmis Communications, is rumored to be mulling a format change to a mix of Spanish and English pop music.
    <br>
    <br>Harris says the decline of local country radio isn’t surprising; the situation is occurring throughout the country.
    <br>
    <br>“There are two audiences, the core country fans and then the people who couldn’t name an artist until Garth Brooks came along,” Harris says. “The record companies and radio stations are chasing the latter audience, and the real fans are being left out in the cold. And they’re not happy about it, which is reflected in low ratings and poor record sales.”
    <br>
    <br>Will stations be able to hold on until country’s next boom? KZLA’s Curtis, who has been with the station on and off since 1980, believes his signal will stay country; Nashville’s Malone thinks new artists like Brad Paisley will rejuvenate the genre’s traditional sound.
    <br>
    <br>Mack’s optimism, though, is guarded.
    <br>
    <br>“It’s always taken that traditional country sound to bring the music back,” Mack says. “But right now, nobody wants to take a chance and play the music people are asking for. A DJ at one of the FM stations in Dallas was telling me that on the weekends they play Hank Williams and Hank Snow because the station doesn’t take the ratings seriously on the weekends.”
    <br>
    <br>“ ‘We get to play the music people want to hear,’ this guy tells me. I told him to think about that statement, because it’s that kind of backward thinking that has got us in the fix that we’re in.”
    <br>
    <br>JasonN

  2. #2
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    Thanks Jason. I've never been into country music or radio, but I can only imagine some fans reaction to this article. As far as I can tell Garth has never been in the music business to run some race with sales. He's in it for the music I think. He wouldn't be gambling with the stakes so high with Chris Gaines if it was that.
    <br> If an artist puts out music they believe in who is anyone to go and rip it apart just because it isn't country enough? This world fights over things they've got no right to mess with. When others get hurt and we don't care it only shows our immaturity as a nation.
    <br> I don't think music has lost it's identity as much as we as humans have simply lost face with each other. Blame it on the music then? Or 'lack' of it as we want it defined? Perhaps it's time to let the music take us where it will instead of taking one another for a ride. Get my drift? It's not Garth's fault the music business has lost it's focus of vision. What's amazing is how Garth's has not only remained intact through his massive success, but has surpassed the norm and is setting a very clear example how it can be done.
    <br> I hope Chris Gaines brings some needed change to the music industry. We could use a hero right now!N

  3. #3
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    Huh uh....
    <br>
    <br>
    “Record companies became so dazzled by his success that they’re now focusing on developing acts that are marketable to the masses instead of looking at what’s special about country music. In the process, the music has lost a lot of its identity and become so much cookie-cutter product.”
    <br>
    <br>So... now they are turning their arrows against Garth for everything!!!
    <br>
    <br>I don't understand this... real good songs like "We Shall Be Free" never hit big on radio...... and now they are saying that stations are not playing what's special about country music?
    <br>
    <br>YEAH, WHAT'S SPECIAL ABOUT COUNTRY MUSIC? I know this!! TURNING ONE'S BACK WHEN HE/SHE IS NO LONGER USEFUL... that's what I see in country music now!!
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>Sorry if I offend any hardcore country fan here... I just got so mad when the true cross-over stars like Shania, Faith, LoneStars, and LeAnn Rimes aren't getting blamed, but Garth himself!! What's the logic to this? They are the people who deliberately change their instruments to SATISFY POP stations.. not GARTH!!!! Garth stays true country music! Even Chris Gaines wasn't meant to be country!!!
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>Geez... I listen to country because of Garth! Not because of cross-overs stars like Shania, Faith, or LeAnn... get over it.. stupid Nashville dickheads!
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>Just one more thing!! Well, I don't know what's their problem with Garth... but the TITLE OF THIS ARTICLE HAS GARTH'S NAME IN IT.. AND THE FOCUS AIN'T EVEN ABOUT GARTH!!!
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>This just proves me that the writers know nothin' about country fans!! They just need someone to blame when country is going downhills... too bad! I ain't responsible for it!!
    <br>
    <br>Tommy
    <br>
    <br><P>(This message has been edited by honky)N
    "Life is like a piano--play to its fullest"

    "A good start is half the job!"


    "When we free do love anyone we choose... WE SHALL BE FREE" by Mr. Brooks

    To the special man in my life: Shnuggie.

  4. #4
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    I agree with Tommyon about all of what he said. Good points Tommy!! :)
    <br>
    <br>Vanessa :)
    <br>N

  5. #5
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    Now that's strange. I listen to Ritz 1035AM a lot and though I knew they'd voted for 'He Stopped Loving Her Today', in months of listening I'd never heard the song.
    <br>
    <br>I pressed 'Post Reply' for this thread and guess what just came on the radio... Was so stunned I had to wait for it to finish before I could type again.N
    Gyrrwch yn ofalus

  6. #6

    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    Well, if that article doesnt make Garth want to retire!!
    <br>I think country music has lost its appeal because Garth isnt making anything right now, not because he has great record sales!! Duh, who do they think buy the records, fans of country music. Garth is way more country than Faith or Shania. Boy, when will they realize that country is changing!! I love Garth and Faith and Shania and Tim, but I also love songs by George Strait and Alan Jackson and The Chicks and I would love to hear more songs by Loretta Lynn and George Jones. I dont want to hear just the country music of today I also love the country music of yesterday and if it was all the same I wouldnt listen to it. Lets face it there will always be controversy over whether Garth is pop or country. The only reason he is really picked on is because he is so popular and his record sales are so big. Pardon me but Sc--- them all!!! If Garth does retire who will they focus their attention on next!!N

  7. #7

    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    I, actually do have some of the same complaints the article has about the state of country music today. The watering down by Hill and Twain towards pop has rubbed me the wrong way a bit. However, what they are doing is clearly successful, so it's hard to question them for their success. In terms of Garth. There is no question to me he is country. Compare his music to the rest of country today and there are twice the fiddles and steel guitars in his songs than most of his competitors. Right now the megastars of the music world are pop stars and country is having trouble accepting that. Outside of the Dixie Chicks, the rest of country is struggling a little bit because the star power lies in the young pop groups of today. The funny thing is they keep mentioning Brad Paisley is going to bring traditional country back. (and I do love his music). Every time Brad Paisley is interviewed, he mentions Garth Brooks as his biggest influence. It's good Brad has shaped his traditional, country music on the "pop, rock style" of Garth Brooks. People forget the country of Hank Williams Jr. and Charlie Daniels had a lot of rock influences in it. Garth's music has a little touch of rock in it, but so has country for years.N

  8. #8
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    Unfortunately the local country station I listened to has suffered the same fate and is now called The Mix.N

  9. #9
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    You know what. I don't even want to start commenting on this topic :mad: sooooo......
    <br>
    <br>:mad:NO COMMENT:mad:
    <br>
    <br>NellyN

  10. #10
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    Like most of you, this article made me so angry I could spit! First of all, when I read the title of the article all I could think of was the big guy’s admonition “Don’t like me, don’t talk about me.” Clearly the choice to use his name in the title of the article was about tapping some of that star power he has that they seem so critical of. Y’know “Will country music survive Chely Wright” just doesn’t have the same ring.
    <br>
    <br>I am not sure that I even understand the complaints they are making. I have big problems with “country” musicians who record country versions and pop versions of songs (Shania, Lonestar) because they are implying that the country sound isn’t good enough to survive on its own. But Garth has NEVER done that. And he has never taken out the fiddles or steel guitars. Hey, have you ever bought a GB album that didn’t have at least one cowboy song on it? Elvis, Johnny Cash and lots of others prove that the lines between rock, country and r&b are not as clearly defined as these people would like to believe.
    <br>
    <br>Okay, I know I’m preaching to the converted. But I just get so angry about this. Five years ago, he was the man who would save country music and now he’s the man who killed it. No wonder he’s lost faith.
    <br>N

  11. #11

    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    They do know Garth hasn't released a country album since 97 (Sevens) right? So how can they blame him for radio going pop when he's only released a fraction of the songs compared to Shania and Faith and the others they mention.
    <br>
    <br>Stupidity at it's highest point, I think:)
    <br>
    <br>dwayneN

  12. #12
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    Double Live was in 1998..
    <br>
    <br>it was pure country too ;)
    <br>
    <br>But that's beside the point LOL ;)
    <br>
    <br>JasonN

  13. #13
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    I need a mad, spit smiley here. ARGG!!! Thye make me so MAD!!
    <br>
    <br>I guess ignorance is bliss!! Garth not true Country???? What the heck is that??
    <br>
    <br>Lori N

  14. #14
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    Very well said everyone, but I really have to agree with Nelly! GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!
    <br>
    <br>JimN
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    If I never try

  15. #15
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    As a country-only fan since b.g.(before Garth) I just want to say I am thankful for Garth, Shania, Faith, etc. because if they weren't as big as they are, places like here in Boston probably wouldn't have country radio stations. I missed Garth's first three years because Boston had lost it's only country station about a year before Garth. I had no interest in any other kind of music. I credit Garth for bringing awareness to country music and music back in my life.
    <br>
    <br>If country stations play them, then I'll consider them country. I love the new sound and I love the twangy sounds. People are always putting twang down yet listen to people talk, scream and cuss their way through songs. I just don't get it.
    <br>
    <br>Lisa
    <br>N
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  16. #16
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    I'm with Lori! What's true country anyway? I think it has more to do with the message than the sound. If the public didn't get it with Garth's recent releases, or take seriously his message, how can we expect the industry to keep itself 'pure'?
    <br> Arguing over these things just creates more walls and divisions. Perhaps it's good the lines between various forms and depths of music is becoming blurred. Then maybe we will be able to see and deal with the real problems of this world..lack of compassion for our fellow man being at the top. We are to be part of the solution. The music lets us know we haven't been doing it, and hopefully drives us toward change for the good.
    <br>We need to fight our battles with love leading the way, not hate. Even in the 'little' things that get us so urked! The Bible says to live in harmony and peace with everyone. To not be too proud to associate with people of low position, and to love one another. Guess we need to listen to what the music is really trying to tell us and realize we are not getting anywhere by fighting over it. We should be living it.
    <br> Thanks Garth and Chris Gaines! I need all the reminders I can get!!!N

  17. #17

    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    I may get flamed to bits for this but, frankly, I am sick to death of all this country music navel-gazing. I've never heard so much whining and moaning in all my days. Do you see Rolling Stone whining constantly because James Brown is passe? Are there pop station DJs going on ad nauseum about why don't we hear enough Barry Manilow these days? A resounding NO.
    <br>
    <br>My one message to them would be 'get over it'. If enough people liked the 'traditional' stuff, then it would sell, wouldn't it? It's not that country artists 'spoiled' country by changing the sound. It's that people's tastes have changed. That's the way of life. How come nobody does the Mashed Potato anymore? Because people got tired of it. How come we don't hear Beethoven on pop radio stations? Because people's tastes changed. There's a place for Beethoven, but he's not 'mainstream' taste now.
    <br>
    <br>If somebody thinks it can sustain a market, then go start a 'traditional country' radio station or video station and see if it flies. If it doesn't, admit that the time is past for 'trad' everything and that life moves on. It's nice to have a listen to the old stuff every now and then but for heaven's sakes, let's get with the program and try something new.
    <br>
    <br>I think it's dorky for people (like Shania and Paul Brandt, for example) who grew up thousands of miles from the American South, to affect an accent which was never theirs to begin with to sing songs. So what do you do? Restrict 'country' only to people who actually sound 'country' or insist that people fake a sound in order to pretend they belong?
    <br>
    <br>I thought people loved 'country' because it has a tale to tell (as if other genres don't, but that's another discussion). Well, if the song tells a tale and it touches the heart, then quit the danged whining and enjoy it.
    <br>
    <br>Cripes.
    <br>
    <br>By the way, I read a direct quote from Larry Cordell. I should have kept it. He said his song was NOT about any artists, but about the music 'business' itself. The poor man must be mortified that everyone is using his song to criticize artists.
    <br>
    <br>
    <br><P>(This message has been edited by AmazedByChris)N

  18. #18

    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    All I have to say is that Garth is country. I was listening to the radio the other day and they played an old Garth song in between the likes of Faith Hill and LoneStar and I said "You know what in a few years they'll have to ask Garth to make a new record just so we can have COUNTRY music on the radio again." His music is so full of the fiddle, and the madolin pops up every now and then. For any one to say that he is not country is a joke. He is about as country as they come. I'm so sick of people saying that brad is the saving grace of country music. That's like saying that Michael Jackson is the king of pop. It's a title he gave himself. Expect for a few cases (Rascall Flats, LoneStar and a few otheres) the guys of country music have strayed so very little that you can't really say that it's not country. The women of country have completely left country behind for the most part except for the Dixie Chicks, Trisha and Reba. The guys never went anywhere and they have no need for anyone to save them. People going out there and saying that we have to save country music is what is going to kill it. It'll just end up insulting more country fans. N

  19. #19
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    I would like to take the time to stick up for someone that can't respond that just got bashed.
    <br>
    . I'm so sick of people saying that brad is the saving grace of country music. That's like saying that Michael Jackson is the king of pop. It's a title he gave himself.
    <br>
    <br>That statement is FARTHEST from the truth..
    <br>1) Mr. Paisley has never or will never say "I will save country" he's in it just as everyone else is and to say he said that, is just flat out wrong.
    <br>
    <br>2) Granted Mr. Paisley is a hell of a great artist... it was THIS WRITERS PERSONAL OPINION about him being the saving grace, and does NOT reflect on Mr. Paisley's personal thoughts.
    <br>
    <br>Thank You,
    <br>and have a great day :)
    <br>JasonN

  20. #20
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    Jason,
    <br>
    <br>
    . I'm so sick of people saying that brad is the saving grace of country music. That's like saying that Michael Jackson is the king of pop. It's a title he gave himself.
    <br>
    <br>That's exactly what Anonymous is trying to say. She said that she is tired of people crediting Brad for saving country music. But she did not criticize Brad personally.
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>Yeah... just to elaborate on Dwayne's point about Garth not having another new country album for years... What is up with country music? Garth hasn't had a new country album for almost 3 years, and they blamed Garth for the POP trend during these years? PUKE!! THEY NEED BRAINS!!!
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>LOL.. it's interesting that during these years when Dixie Chicks came out, they are the savior of country music... and while Garth is not doing anything country, he's become the person who destroys country music... I don't see the logic here.
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>Recently I got so tired of listening to my radio stations....
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>Tommy
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>N
    "Life is like a piano--play to its fullest"

    "A good start is half the job!"


    "When we free do love anyone we choose... WE SHALL BE FREE" by Mr. Brooks

    To the special man in my life: Shnuggie.

  21. #21
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    Isn't this an old article recycled? It seems as if I've read this before.N

  22. #22
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    I wish I could send this to that paper.....
    <br>
    <br>Life is about changes.
    <br>
    <br>Change is inevitable, whether it be music, society, religion, politics. Accept it and move on.
    <br>
    <br>This world would be a pretty boring place if everything stayed the same.
    <br>
    <br>Thats it !!!!!!!!!!!N

  23. #23
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    I don't get it either. I never bought a Garth album because it was meant to be bought. I bought them because I relate to the music. Garth's music is about following your dreams. He even has a lot of sad songs. I do like old country songs as well. I was getting tired of hearing My Wife Left Me With My Dog In My Truck. That idea of a song was being used constantly troughout country music. I do relate to some of the songs of the past. Then in 1989 comes Garth. He starts having songs mean other things instead of lost of something. He writes about how you move on after your lost and find something else to go on. He talks about going after your dreams. He has more meaning in his songs than any other artist ever that I heard. I don't care if he was after record sales, I would just say hey Garth, at least you did it. You are now a legend. The only reason he is blamed for wanting more record sales is because he majored in marketing in college. To me No Fences will always be the number one selling country album because it was released only to country radio and there were no pop versions. Shania's main selling point is Pop, I garentee it. She can't make an album that is just released to country radio because she wants more. The only way I will consider any album being bigger than Garth's No Fences is if the album that beat the sales of No Fences was only released to Country radio.N

  24. #24
    Join Date
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    lol....well, truthfully, I shouldn't even be commenting on the article, cuz I didn't actually read anything beyond the cookie cutter line, but I'm guessing the last half was just a stupid as the first. Sooooo....I'm just not gonna get worked up over this, cuz the pinhead who wrote it just doesn't deserve that much of my time or energy! This journalist (and I use the term hesitantly) just doesn't have a clue what Garth is and ISN'T all about.N

  25. #25

    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    Hello all.
    <br>This one I have to comment on. LOL.
    <br>
    <br>I sort of agree with this article on one level. I don't like any of the pop-country acts (Dixie Chicks, Shania, Faith, etc. It even looks like Tim may be going that way now). And it's for the exact reason that they just want more fans, more sales, and more money. That bothers me (refer back to my Napster argument).
    <br>
    <br>But why do they blame Garth for this? Yes, Garth opened the flood gates for this. These artists could have either done good with the fame that Garth brought country or not. They went the evil way, so why blame Garth for that. Garth has used what he did for good (United Way, Touch Em All, etc.), but how can you blame Garth because other artists are now exploiting country music.
    <br>
    <br>Garth can't manage these peoples career, and he can't just come out publicly and rip on these performers because, unfortunately, it isn't his character.N

  26. #26
    Join Date
    May 1999
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    12,819

    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    But Brooks’ mass appeal came with a price — namely, the music. The more albums Brooks sold, the more he became obsessed with chart positions and gimmick marketing. Essentially, he has become the McDonald’s of modern music, his laser focus trained not on the songs, but on the number of units sold as he edges closer and closer to the Beatles’ all-time record.
    <br>Correct:)
    <br>
    <br>The rest about Garth is more or less BS to me:eek: I don't agree much with that.
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>Amazed
    <br>
    If enough people liked the 'traditional' stuff, then it would sell, wouldn't it? It's not that country artists 'spoiled' country by changing the sound. It's that people's tastes have changed. That's the way of life. How come nobody does the Mashed Potato anymore? Because people got tired of it. How come we don't hear Beethoven on pop radio stations? Because people's tastes changed. There's a place for Beethoven, but he's not 'mainstream' taste now.
    <br>I agree about this as well:):):)
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>BrianN
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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    Let's rise out of this dirt
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    The ignorance, intolerance, stupidity and lies
    That's spreading like a virus and ruining our lives
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  27. #27

    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    I just do not see why it is a mortal sin to want to have a CD released to other audiences and markets. Do the pop/rock fans moan and complain when pop songs are remixed for dance audiences? No. Who cares? And if people are making money, so what? It is, after all, their livelihood. Why not just listen to music because it's good and you like it? It's like people liking Chris Gaines until they find out it's Garth. How silly is that? You like it because you like it.N

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 1998
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
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    4,771

    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    Brian,
    <br>
    <br>Sorry, I have to disagree with you to certain degree.
    <br>
    <br>
    Essentially, he has become the McDonald’s of modern music, his laser focus trained not on the songs, but on the number of units sold as he edges closer and closer to the Beatles’ all-time record.
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>This is not so true though. If Garth wanted to surpass the Beattles in selling, he would have release a couple more country albums to accomplish that. But in reality, Garth has not year released a country CD for a long time. Yeah, you can say that Chris Gaines is an attempt, but it is too risky to call it an attempt. I think reaching the Beattle's status used to be Garth's goal. But because of all the things happened to him, I doubt he has that much energy left. Even if he does, it's not now.
    <br>
    <br>
    his laser focus trained not on the songs
    <br>
    <br>And this is not true too! If Garth only cares about sales, he would have released "When you come back to me again" as a purchasing single. That would also help out the overall selling. But Garth did not ;) Besides, the quality of the new song was take care of. Not that the song is meant to be sales. In conclusion, Garth is not obssessed with his sales.
    <br>
    <br>I hope you understood what I am trying to say.
    <br>
    <br>You can call the Double Lives and First Editions the so-called gimmicks, but they are history now. At least he has not released 2 or 3 country albums since 97.
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>Tommy
    <br>N
    "Life is like a piano--play to its fullest"

    "A good start is half the job!"


    "When we free do love anyone we choose... WE SHALL BE FREE" by Mr. Brooks

    To the special man in my life: Shnuggie.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    May 1999
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    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    Tommy
    <br>
    <br>Okay, I'll surrender;) I agree with your last quote off my quote off the article;);)
    <br>
    <br>But, I still think that he had it as his only goal to surpass The Beatles sales when he realised how close he could be.
    <br>And even a quote posted a few days ago here on PG state that.
    <br>Something about that he don't know whether he should go after the "trophee" now that he is so close.
    <br>I can't remember the exact quote, but I do remember that he has always said that the sales figures meant absolutely nothing to him.
    <br>So how come he suddenly change his mind about this?
    <br>I think he is peeved that the CG album didn't sell the 7-8 millions he probably expected;) I think he thought the CG album was a sure thing, that most of the people would run out and buy it with HIS name on, but here his marketing brain had a tiny miscalculation;);)
    <br>It's sad it didn't sell more because it's a great album:)
    <br>
    <br>I don't think WYCBTMA would matter much, but all the first editions, the DL covers and the boxed set are evidence enough that he is very much speculating in units sold:)
    <br>
    <br>BrianN
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    COME ON! Let's Join Up!
    Let's rise out of this dirt
    Escape from this oppression this anger and this hurt
    The ignorance, intolerance, stupidity and lies
    That's spreading like a virus and ruining our lives
    All we need is honesty to push away this night
    Lets hang on to our innocence and hold each other tight
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ~*~*~Die Toten Hosen~*~*~

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 1998
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    464

    RE: Los Angeles paper diss' Garth etc.

    I got hooked on Garth because of his clever marketing ploys and I will be eternally grateful.N

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