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Thread: Is It Me Or Are Radio Stations Hypocites

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Is It Me Or Are Radio Stations Hypocites

    I was thinking about Dive Bar Tour and how all the radio stations jump on the band wagon for a chance to publicize the mini tour yet the single is barely staying on the charts. You'd think they'd really be pushing the song. Thet know Garth has a strong fan base yet don't play his music. I would have checked which stations were playing the music and then decide where the tour would make stops. Reward the supporters.

  2. #2
    It doesn't work that way. The radio market is still very rigged.
    Last edited by wimpy77; 08-21-2019 at 12:00 AM.

  3. #3
    This is the #1 country song on the charts right now. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7U6AoZ27yE

    Do you think has a chance against that? Nope.

  4. #4
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    :-( I guess. Just sad.

  5. #5
    It's exactly why I don't go to modern radio of any genre anymore, they just flat out suck, way I see it radio is just as much a part of the problem the same way the record label is the problem.

  6. #6
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    I really hesitate to jump in here because I'm sure this is an unpopular opinion. However, I actually worked in country radio for over 7 years so feel like I have some insight on how this works.

    I can't speak for all stations, but I know when I worked in radio our station played what the listeners wanted to hear. It didn't matter whether our programmer, or anyone else at the station, liked the song or thought it was "country". The question was, is it performing well in our listening area? There were songs that were popular in our listening area that performed better than they did on the national charts and those songs actually got played more. There were songs performing well nationally that did not perform well in our area and we played them less. You see the formula was really simple. The more listeners we got the better our local ratings were. The better the local ratings were the more the advertising department could charge for adds. In other words, it boiled down to what songs could make our station the most money. It was that simple. It didn't matter if it was "country". It mattered if people didn't turn the dial when we played it.

    This is where you break down the demographics.
    - About 1/3 of all country music listeners fall within the 18-34 age range.
    - An additional 13% are ages 13-24.
    - That means that close to 50% of people who listen to country radio are 13-34.
    - Only 32% are 44 years of age and older.
    -Women are more likely than men to be country music listeners (54%-46%). And regardless of what they say the research has historically shown women drastically prefer listening to male artists than female artists. (Men prefer that as well according to the research.)

    This means if you break it down you are really interested in that 13-34 range. Not only because they are a big slice of your demographic pie, but also because they are the most likely to spend money. Therefore advertisers are interested in them.

    Back a few years ago people went nuts over "tomato gate" when it was stated that women are the tomatoes in the salad. The guy even went so far as to say that if you want to keep your listeners, don't play women. People called him a sexist and made fun of him, but what is ironic is he was simply looking at the numbers. All the numbers, at that time, showed that to be true. Singles by women were testing horribly. It wasn't sexism or that old white male radio programmers didn't want to play women. It was that people were changing the station and all the stats showed that. We may not like the truth, and it may not fit the narrative, but it is the truth. Women were played like crazy in the 90s and that is because the women artists of the 90s were beloved, sold millions of albums, tested very well in the research, and people were listening!!! Those same stations had no problem playing women 20 years ago. Again, BECAUSE PEOPLE LISTENED!!!

    Obviously country music shifted around the explosion of Florida Georgia Line, Jason Aldean, Luke Bryan, etc. You also had shifts happening from sales to streaming, the downturn of the album and the rise of the single, etc. So country music as a whole (labels, radio, everything) made a bigger push for the younger demographic. That is why you got "bro-country", a real appeal to basically a teens/20s demo. Again, because this group buys/streams music. They respond to advertising, etc. Unfortunately, what that did is alienate and push out some older listeners, but the reward was worth the risk...at least in the short term for the industry.

    I guess my ultimate point here is, whether we like what the numbers have to say or not, it is easy to forget this is a business. The industry is going to go where the money is. They don't care if that makes us mad. What they care is they cut the biggest slice of the pie possible. When the money shifts to a new trend they are going to follow that trend. If people start listening to bro-country they will play bro-country. If people start listening to women they will play women. If people start listening to Texas country all over the country they will play Texas country.

    I know some may say, well I listen to those things, but it is always important to remember that just because we do that doesn't mean everyone else does. They are going to follow the numbers and that just is what it is. The beautiful part is in 2019 we have a lot of options other than country radio.

    On a final note, I am a firm believer that a shift is taking place and that bro-country has actually been dead for a while. It will take some time for the new trends to really set in but they will. Who knows, the next trend we might all like.
    Last edited by rhd13; 08-21-2019 at 09:40 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rhd13 View Post
    I really hesitate to jump in here because I'm sure this is an unpopular opinion. However, I actually worked in country radio for over 7 years so feel like I have some insight on how this works.

    I can't speak for all stations, but I know when I worked in radio our station played what the listeners wanted to hear. It didn't matter whether our programmer, or anyone else at the station, liked the song or thought it was "country". The question was, is it performing well in our listening area? There were songs that were popular in our listening area that performed better than they did on the national charts and those songs actually got played more. There were songs performing well nationally that did not perform well in our area and we played them less. You see the formula was really simple. The more listeners we got the better our local ratings were. The better the local ratings were the more the advertising department could charge for adds. In other words, it boiled down to what songs could make our station the most money. It was that simple. It didn't matter if it was "country". It mattered if people didn't turn the dial when we played it.

    This is where you break down the demographics.
    - About 1/3 of all country music listeners fall within the 18-34 age range.
    - An additional 13% are ages 13-24.
    - That means that close to 50% of people who listen to country radio are 13-34.
    - Only 32% are 44 years of age and older.
    -Women are more likely than men to be country music listeners (54%-46%). And regardless of what they say the research has historically shown women drastically prefer listening to male artists than female artists. (Men prefer that as well according to the research.)

    This means if you break it down you are really interested in that 13-34 range. Not only because they are a big slice of your demographic pie, but also because they are the most likely to spend money. Therefore advertisers are interested in them.

    Back a few years ago people went nuts over "tomato gate" when it was stated that women are the tomatoes in the salad. The guy even went so far as to say that if you want to keep your listeners, don't play women. People called him a sexist and made fun of him, but what is ironic is he was simply looking at the numbers. All the numbers, at that time, showed that to be true. Singles by women were testing horribly. It wasn't sexism or that old white male radio programmers didn't want to play women. It was that people were changing the station and all the stats showed that. We may not like the truth, and it may not fit the narrative, but it is the truth. Women were played like crazy in the 90s and that is because the women artists of the 90s were beloved, sold millions of albums, tested very well in the research, and people were listening!!! Those same stations had no problem playing women 20 years ago. Again, BECAUSE PEOPLE LISTENED!!!

    Obviously country music shifted around the explosion of Florida Georgia Line, Jason Aldean, Luke Bryan, etc. You also had shifts happening from sales to streaming, the downturn of the album and the rise of the single, etc. So country music as a whole (labels, radio, everything) made a bigger push for the younger demographic. That is why you got "bro-country", a real appeal to basically a teens/20s demo. Again, because this group buys/streams music. They respond to advertising, etc. Unfortunately, what that did is alienate and push out some older listeners, but the reward was worth the risk...at least in the short term for the industry.

    I guess my ultimate point here is, whether we like what the numbers have to say or not, it is easy to forget this is a business. The industry is going to go where the money is. They don't care if that makes us mad. What they care is they cut the biggest slice of the pie possible. When the money shifts to a new trend they are going to follow that trend. If people start listening to bro-country they will play bro-country. If people start listening to women they will play women. If people start listening to Texas country all over the country they will play Texas country.

    I know some may say, well I listen to those things, but it is always important to remember that just because we do that doesn't mean everyone else does. They are going to follow the numbers and that just is what it is. The beautiful part is in 2019 we have a lot of options other than country radio.

    On a final note, I am a firm believer that a shift is taking place and that bro-country has actually been dead for a while. It will take some time for the new trends to really set in but they will. Who knows, the next trend we might all like.
    Awesome insight. Thank you.

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