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View Full Version : Chesney and other country artists respond to Waylon's passing



fuzzwuzz
02-15-2002, 02:01 AM
I learned alot about Waylon from this cdnow atricle that comes out of the mouths of artists who looked up to him.
Kenny Chesney, Eddie Montgomery, & Others React To Waylon Jennings' Death
Feb 14, 2002, 1:05 pm PT


Waylon Jennings
Waylon Jennings' fellow country singers choked back tears Wednesday (Feb. 13) to praise the singer. Jennings, the singer of such country classics as "Good Hearted Woman" and "I've Always Been Crazy," died peacefully while napping in his Chandler, Ariz., home Wednesday (see related story in news).

"I tell you what, man, we lost a hell of a legend," says Eddie Montgomery, of country duo Montgomery Gentry, as he struggled to find words to express Jennings' influence on him. "Your heroes, you never think they'll leave this world."

Asleep at the Wheel's Ray Benson recalls his early encounters with the singer. "The first time I saw him was in one of those grade-B Nashville flicks, Nashville Rebel -- 1969, I think it was," Benson says. "Then in 1973, we played with Willie Nelson, Sammi Smith, and Waylon somewhere in Texas. We all really idolized him. Waylon, for all us young outlaws -- what would become outlaws, we were hippies playing country music -- Waylon was this incredible guy who bridged country with rock and roll. He had played with Buddy Holly.

"His sensibilities were leaning more towards Bob Dylan," continues Benson. "And he was obviously a pill head. We didn't know what he was, but he was cool. We met him, and I remember he came up to us after the show and told me, 'You know, Bob Wills was a revolutionary in his day.' Then, I knew, this guy was cool. We played hundreds of shows with him and hung out for thousands of hours."

The last show the two acts played together came in Chicago last August, and Benson says he could see Jennings' health was failing. "He couldn't walk on the stage when we played -- he had to have a little scooter to get from the bus to the stage, and a cane to get from the scooter to the microphone."

Rodney Crowell, who penned Jennings' hits "I Ain't Living Long Like This" and "Till I Gain Control Again," remembers Jennings first as a man who always asked after Crowell's daughter. "That was the thing about Waylon -- he was just so sweet," Crowell tells us. "He was a sweetheart. He looked like a gruff outlaw, but he was really sweet."

Crowell adds: "It's hard to measure the impact of him being the first guy to tell the record companies in Nashville, 'Hey, I'm going to use my own band, and if you don't like it, kiss off.' The fact that he succeeded makes that even better."

Kenny Chesney struggled to keep his composure as he recalled a missed chance to meet one of his idols. Both singers attended a function hosted by the RCA Label Group, for which Chesney now records, and which released Jennings' records for 20 years.

"I was honestly scared to go up and talk to him," admits Chesney. "It was one of the first times I'd ever seen Waylon, and I was absolutely starstruck. I learned a lot from him, for not even meeting him. He had his niche. He had his style. He blazed his own trail. He didn't care what anybody thought about it. That was a true artist."


-- Brian Mansfield

loreli
02-15-2002, 10:49 AM
Awww This was so sad :(

He was well respected and loved. That really says what a good man he was.

Lori

GriggsGarthGirl
02-15-2002, 11:16 AM
"Waylon's friendship to me was as big as his music. With a broken heart I smile 'cause I can see him crossing over, softly singing, 'Storms Never Last.' I'm gonna miss ya, hoss."--Andy Griggs

Andy is a huge Waylon fan. When he got his deal at RCA records the first thing he did was walk into Joe Galante's office and told him that he wanted to cut a song with Waylon. Next thing he knew they were recording a song called "Shine On Me" for Andy's debut CD. Shortly after that Andy and Waylon became good friends.

If you have Andy's "You Won't Ever Be Lonely" CD you'll see a quote in there from Waylon--

"You take a good gospel singer, add a little rock 'n' roll and a country song from a country boy, and you've got yourself a winning combination--and besides, he's a good friend of mine."--Waylon Jennings

He will be missed. :(

allisonv7
02-15-2002, 12:19 PM
Waylon said something pretty bad about garth one time...something like "He couldn't sing his way out of a plastic bag..." Does anyone know the exact and whole quote??


allison.

splitzer
02-15-2002, 07:45 PM
Allison,

He may have, I honestly don't know, but let's be sure not to turn a sweet, memory-filled thread about a lost legend into a Waylon-bashing conversation. Seems disrespectful to me. There are a lot of people in the world who don't like Garth's music, just like I don't much care for the Backstreet Boys' music. It wasn't a nice thing to say, but shall we forgive and forget? ;)

No offense, Allison, I hope you know that. :) I know you weren't bashing Waylon, but I'm afraid that's where this could head.

Garth Always,
Dani

RckyMtnGirl@hrt
02-15-2002, 09:29 PM
My mom and dad are big Waylon fans (as well as Willy N.), and we were all sad to hear of his passing.

God Bless ya Waylon.

CC

fuzzwuzz
02-15-2002, 10:29 PM
Memories and condolences are still pouring out of the music industry as it mourns the loss of one of country's best, Waylon Jennings, who died in his sleep on Wednesday (Feb. 13) (allstar, Feb. 14). Here is what some have to say:

Chuck Berry: "I was very sorry to hear of the passing of Waylon Jennings. Although we came from far different backgrounds, I have always enjoyed his music. I thought his lyrics were very poetic and I consider him a brother songwriter."

Brad Martin: "I remember playing Waylon Jennings' music when I was in my dad's band growing up. With the conviction Waylon put in the lyrics of his songs, he not only sang the songs, he lived them. He was the man; he was the music."

Kix Brooks: "It's a great loss. Waylon was one of the reasons I got into country music. He was a great artist who always did things his way. A true original talent, and I wish there were more like him"

Hank Williams Jr.: "When I walked on the connecting flight, the first eyes I locked onto were Waylon's -- he was sitting there with Jessie on the same flight I was catching. We got to sit together and shoot the breeze, and I had a chance to show him the song I had just written that day. I know he wouldn't care me tellin' he had tears in his eyes that day -- especially not today when we've all got 'em." (Williams is recalling the inspiration for a tribute to Jennings that he wrote, titled "Eyes of Waylon.")

Troy Gentry of Montgomery Gentry: "Waylon Jennings was the baddest, just the baddest there ever was. He did it his way, without compromising -- and it's what made people love him. Listen to his records and they hit as hard today as they did back when.

And when Eddie and I came to town, a lot of people I think thought we were a little too wild. You know, Kentucky guys from the honky tonks who just wanted to be rowdy. Waylon reached out to us, though. When he made that live record at the Ryman, he asked us to come sing with him on it.

Now we don't get intimidated by much. But we'd never been on the stage of the Ryman, which is heavy enough. Standing there, waiting to go out, my knees were a little weak -- and then to hear Waylon say, 'These ol' boys remind me a little of myself. They do things their own way.' It was all I could do to walk out there. Someone so alive being gone ... there just aren't words for it."

Richard Young of the Kentucky Headhunters: "He was a great influence on us. We emulated his style and the way he did it. He made us feel like it was okay to come from outside Music Row and do it your own way. The closest thing to rock and roll that ever happened to country music just left. Him and Johnny Cash -- they were our rockers. Now one's gone."

Sony Music Nashville's Allen Butler: "We are deeply saddened by the loss of one of country music's greatest performers. Waylon Jennings was truly an original talent the likes of which the music world will never see again. We're honored and grateful here at Sony Nashville to have worked with Waylon on his last record. His style and unwavering tenacity will never be forgotten."

Mark Chesnutt: "From the time I was a little boy I sang all Waylon's songs, even dressed like him -- I guess I always wanted to be like him. The best thing was getting to be friends with him. I'd always call Waylon when I was ticked at someone at the label or my management and he'd listen, then say 'All the hell with 'em, you just go tell 'em to kiss your butt.' Then I'd say 'Awe Waylon, I can't do that, you're the only one who can get away with that!' He was a great friend and a stylist like no other.

"I was fortunate enough a few years back to record 'Rainy Day Woman' with Waylon for one of my records. That's a day I'll never forget. At the time, my wife was pregnant with our first son. When we were done in the studio that day, as he was leaving, and I was gushing with gratitude, he looked at my wife and said jokingly, 'The only thing I want out of this deal is for you to name that baby after me.' Waylon was so tickled when we called to tell him that our son was named after him."


-- Carrie Borzillo-Vrenna

allisonv7
02-16-2002, 12:56 PM
Originally posted by splitzer
Allison,

He may have, I honestly don't know, but let's be sure not to turn a sweet, memory-filled thread about a lost legend into a Waylon-bashing conversation. Seems disrespectful to me. There are a lot of people in the world who don't like Garth's music, just like I don't much care for the Backstreet Boys' music. It wasn't a nice thing to say, but shall we forgive and forget? ;)

No offense, Allison, I hope you know that. :) I know you weren't bashing Waylon, but I'm afraid that's where this could head.

Garth Always,
Dani

I'm not bashing Waylon at all, I'm a big fan of his, and I don't think what I wrote was disrespectful at all. If you took it like that I'm sorry. I just was wondering what the quote was, Waylon had no beef about letting his true feelings be known and he didn't regret it, and I don't think he would have wanted that comment to be forgiven and forgotten.


allison.